Alyssa Cooper

The Wordweaver

1 note

"It’s a strange feeling, to be dead."  Get The Motel Room now for only $0.99! http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JHV0U9E The Motel Room is a new take on the classic ghost story, telling the tale of a haunted motel room from the perspective of the haunter, rather than the haunted.  Since his death, our Narrator has been trapped in a motel room, watching the comings and goings of his nightly guests. The strangers never stay more than a night or two, and they never pay him any mind. Then one morning, a maid turns her head and the two lock eyes - the first time he has been seen since his death. Only then does he begin to discover the true power behind his ghostly form.

"It’s a strange feeling, to be dead."

Get The Motel Room now for only $0.99!

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JHV0U9E

The Motel Room is a new take on the classic ghost story, telling the tale of a haunted motel room from the perspective of the haunter, rather than the haunted.
Since his death, our Narrator has been trapped in a motel room, watching the comings and goings of his nightly guests. The strangers never stay more than a night or two, and they never pay him any mind. Then one morning, a maid turns her head and the two lock eyes - the first time he has been seen since his death. Only then does he begin to discover the true power behind his ghostly form.

Filed under short story ebook ghost haunted

28 notes

We inherit from antiquity the image of the poet as bard and storyteller—one who who sings, or sang, the narratives of the tribe, preserving the collective memory of her or his people. This is the kind of poet most literature textbooks like to open with—as if all poets emerged out of one blind man’s mouth. But there were other kinds of poets as well: those who chanted, cast spells, shrieked or whispered nonsense or fragments of words or images, making magic come into being through language.
Ilya Kaminsky, “A Note on Rae Armantrout” (via emmaylor)

(via polodavinciroc)

58 notes

Always there was this feeling of an unseen force, a fine net drawn round us with infinite skill and delicacy, holding us so lightly that it was only at some supreme moment that one realized that one was indeed entangled in its meshes.

John Watson

from The Hound of the Baskervilles, (The Complete Sherlock Holmes [x])

(Source: skulls-and-tea, via friend2friend08)

694 notes

Stories are compasses and architecture; we navigate by them, we build our sanctuaries and our prisons out of them, and to be without a story is to be lost in the vastness of a world that spreads in all directions like arctic tundra or sea ice. To love someone is to put yourself in their place, we say, which is to put yourself in their story, or to figure out how to tell their story. Which means that a place is a story, and stories are geography, and empathy is first of all an act of imagination, a storyteller’s art, and then a way of traveling from here to there.
Rebecca Solnit, The Faraway Nearby (via doskapozora)

(via sarcasticfirefly)

725 notes

I carry your heart with me (I carry it in my heart)I am never without it (anywhere
I go you go,my dear; and whatever is done by only me is your doing,my darling)
I fear no fate (for you are my fate,my sweet)I want no world (for beautiful you are my world,my true)
and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant and whatever a sun will always sing is you

here is the deepest secret nobody knows
(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud and the sky of the sky of a tree called life; which grows
higher than the soul can hope or mind can hide)
and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart

I carry your heart (I carry it in my heart).

e.e. cummings (via observando)

(via no-promises-to-keep)